We work with families who know that their child has a delay, but is not receiving services. How should we use ASQ-3 with a child who will more than likely score below the cutoff?

In this situation, providers need to be sensitive to parents' concerns and feelings, especially if it is likely that ASQ-3 items will be difficult for the child. Asking parents about the strengths of their child and starting there is a good idea. You could even ask parents to complete the ASQ-3 areas out of order to help parents realize that their child has strengths. Because a child with scores below the cutoff in one or more areas should be referred for further evaluation, you may not need to have the parents complete all areas of ASQ-3, especially if the child won't be able to do many items. The provider should start the meeting with the parents aware of the cutoff points for each area, and if the parents' answers indicate that the child is below the cutoff in the first two areas, you can stop. Another suggestion is to have parents complete a younger, "easier" ASQ-3 interval first so the parent knows the child can accomplish many tasks.

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  • 15-Jun-2018
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