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Showing articles from calculator tag

I struggle with calculating adjusted scores when there are unanswered items on the ASQ screener. Is there a way to help me calculate adjusted scores more accurately?

When it comes to screening, accuracy is important. Don't second guess your by- hand calculations—use our online calculator instead! If there are any missing or omitted responses, easily determine a child's adjusted score with our [ASQ Adjusted Score Calculator][1]. Simply indicate which screening tool is being used (…

We give parents both ASQ-3 and ASQ:SE-2 at the same time. Which ASQ:SE-2 questionnaire should be used if there isn't a questionnaire that corresponds directly to child's age assessed with ASQ-3 (for example, 8 months)?

There are no gaps between age intervals for ASQ-3 and ASQ:SE-2 questionnaires so there is always a questionnaire available for children in the appropriate age ranges (1-66 months for ASQ-3 and 1-72 months for ASQ:SE-2). Even when there is not an ASQ:SE-2 questionnaire with the exact same age as an ASQ-3 questionnaire,…

The age calculator on the website sometimes gives an age that is slightly different than if I calculate by hand using the instructions in the User's Guide. Why does this occur?

The age calculator on the [website ][1]and in the app stores uses an actual calendar to calculate a child's age. It takes into account which months have 30 days and which months have 31 days, and therefore provides a more precise age calculation. For ease of use, the manual calculation described in the User's Guides a…

How do you score a section accurately when a parent is unable to answer a question because they have never attempted the activity and are not able to try it at the time?

The authors recommend that the professional attempt to allow the parent to try the activity at a later time. However, if that is not possible, the item can be skipped. Up to 2 items can be omitted per area for ASQ-3. Instructions for scoring questionnaires with omitted items can be found on page 72 of the User's Guide…

When calculating a child's age, what is your month equivalent in weeks? If a child is 44 weeks old, is he 11 months old?

When calculating a child's age, the developers recommend calculating in months and days, rather than weeks. Because all months except for February are longer than 4 weeks, using 4 weeks to represent a month increases a child's age artificially. For easy age calculation, you can use our [website calculator][1] or the f…

The ASQ calculator app provides adjusted age calculations for children born up to 13 weeks premature. Because it does not provide options over 13 weeks premature, does this mean these tools are not valid and reliable for infants born at 14 weeks premature or earlier?

ASQ-3 and ASQ:SE-2 can be used with infants born more than 13 weeks premature. When the iOS version of the calculator app was developed several years ago, infants that survived when born more than 13 weeks premature were rare. We plan to update the iOS app in the future but do not have a timeline at this point. The [a…

How do you calculate what age interval of the ASQ-3 should be used?

To determine the correct ASQ-3 interval for a child, you need to calculate a child's age in months and days. For easy age calculation, you can use our website [calculato][1]r at or the free ASQ Calculator app available in the Apple and Google Play app stores. A by-hand method is described on page 65 of the ASQ-3 User'…

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